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The Truth of the "time" we are in ...
signs and symbols ...images ...served ...

And the measures and matters of The Truth of the "time" we are in ...how "man" ..."thought to change time and times ...
signs and symbols ...images ...served ...
the supposed ...star of David ...and another ...

Dearly beloved, be not ignorant of this one thing, how that one day is with the Lord, as a thousand year, and a thousand year as one day. The Lord is not slack to fulfil his promise, as some men count slackness: but is patient to us ward, and would have no man lost, but would receive all men to repentance.

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     Behold in a nighmare of the dark season ...of the times and time ..of the season of man ...see son of man ...

     Behold within the midst of the nightmare appeared what is called the "star of David" ...and another symbol ...

     Now the symbol that is called "the star of David" looks like this ...

      However when this symbol is looked into ...in an encyclopedia ...we find this ...that this symbol is not what it is said to be ...namely ....

     The shield of David is not mentioned in rabbinic literature. Notably, not a single archeological proof exists as yet concerning the use of this symbol in the Holy Land in ancient times, even after King David. A David's shield has recently been noted on a Jewish tombstone at Taranto, in Southern Italy, which may date as early as the third century of the common era. The earliest Jewish literary source which mentions it, the Eshkol ha-Kofer of the Karaite Judah Hadassi (middle of the 12th century), says, in ch. 242: "Seven names of angels precede the mezuzah: Michael, Gabriel, etc.... Tetragrammaton protect thee! And likewise the sign called 'David's shield' is placed beside the name of each angel." It was, therefore, at this time a sign on amulets.

     In magic papyri of antiquity, pentagrams, together with stars and other signs, are frequently found on amulets bearing the Jewish names of God, and used to guard against fever and other diseases. Curiously enough, only the pentacle appears, not the hexagram. In the great magic papyrus at Paris and London there are twenty-two signs side by side, and a circle with twelve signs, but neither a pentacle nor a hexagram. The syncretism of Hellenistic, Jewish, and Coptic influences probably did not, therefore, originate the symbol. It is possible that it was the Kabbalah that derived the symbol from the Templars. Kabbalah makes use of this sign, arranging the Ten Sephiroth, or spheres, in it, and placing it on amulets.

     Looking further into this sin bowl ...the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia on Jewish symbols ...says the same thing ...

     In the magic papyri of antiquity, pentagrams, together with stars and other signs, are frequently found on amulets bearing the Jewish names of God—"Sabaoth," "Adonai," "Eloai"—and used to guard against fever and other diseases (Wessely, "Neue Zauberpapyri," pp. 68, 70, and note). Curiously enough, only the pentacle appears, not the hexagram. In the great magic papyrus at Paris and London there are twenty-two signs side by side, and a circle with twelve signs......

     

     and the shamash.org on the hexagram ..again the same ...that this sin bowl comes from magic ...

     So, where did the symbol come from? Intertwined equilateral triangles is a common symbol in the Middle East and North Africa, and is thought to bring good luck. In early usage, it was chiefly associated with magic or with the insignia of individual families or communities. Because of its geometric symmetry, the hexagram has been a popular symbol in many cultures from earliest times. Anthropologists claim that the triangle pointing downward represents female sexuality, and the triangle pointing upward, male sexuality; thus, their combination symbolizes unity and harmony. In alchemy, the two triangles symbolize "fire" and "water"; together, they represent the reconciliation of opposites. Some medieval alchemists even borrowed the talmudic pun - ish mayim, fiery water, and shamayim, heaven - to demonstrate the interpenetration of the two realms. Because if this symbolism, the hexagram was even used occasionally as the emblem displayed above a brandy shop.

     So how did it get associated with Judaism? The earliest known Jewish use of the hexagram was as a seal in ancient Palestine (6th century B.C.E.) and then eight centuries later in a synagogue frieze in Capernaum. But these early hexagrams may have been only ornamental designs; ironically, a swastika, another popular ancient motif, appears alongside the hexagram on the Capernaum synagogue wall.

     In the Middle Ages, hexagrams appear frequently on churches, but rarely in synagogues or on Jewish ritual objects. Note also that, during this time, Jews often were required to wear badges to identify themselves as Jews, much as they were in Nazi Germany, but these Jewish badges were not always the familiar Magen David. For example, a fifteenth century painting by Nuno Goncalves features a rabbi wearing a six-pointed badge that looks more or less like an asterisk.

     It was the menorah that served as the primary Jewish symbol from antiquity until the post-Renaissance period, not the "Jewish star." Although there have been attempts to trace the Star of David back to King David himself; to Rabbi Akiva and the Bar Kokhba ("son of the star") rebellion (135 CE); or to kabbalists, especially Rabbi Isaac Luria (16th century), there is no documented evidence of this claim in Jewish literature or artifacts. Rather, all evidence suggests that the early use of the hexagram was limited to "practical Kabbalah", probably dating back to the 6th century CE. Legends connect this symbol with the "Seal of Solomon," the "magical" signet signet ring used by King Solomon to control demons and spirits.

     

     

and the other symbol shown me was like this

     

     this is yet to be shown ....

     

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